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kitchen counter table 7

kitchen counter table 7

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graphic kitchen counter table 7
graphic kitchen counter table 7

Perfect For a Crowded Shop This router table is bigger than most but takes up less storage space because it isn't mounted on legs or a cabinet. To use the table, lay it across sawhorses. To store it, hang it on a wall or slip it into any narrow space. Storing the table


The first step is to cut up the section of countertop. Some countertops have a hump just above the rounded front edge. If yours does, you’ll have to cut off a couple of inches and lose the finished front edge. Next, cut off the backsplash. Lay the countertop upside down and clamp on a straight board to guide your circular saw. You can make the other cuts with a circular saw or table saw. Keep in mind that saw teeth leave chips as they exit plastic laminate. To avoid chipping, cut with the laminate face up on a table saw or face down with a circular saw. A cut laminate edge is sharp enough to slice skin. To dull those sharp edges, make a few quick passes with sandpaper.


After the table’s cut to size, create a hole for the router insert plate. Place the insert plate 3-1/2 in. from the back edge of the table and build a guide around it (Photo 1). My guide is 1/2 in. thick; perfect for a 1-in.-long pattern bit. For a shorter or longer bit, use thicker or thinner material. Before cutting the groove (Photo 2), set the router bit depth. Stack two scraps of the guide material and the plate. Set your router on the plate and adjust the depth. To finish the hole, cut along the inner edge of the groove (Photo 3).


This router table is bigger than most but takes up less storage space because it isn't mounted on legs or a cabinet. To use the table, lay it across sawhorses. To store it, hang it on a wall or slip it into any narrow space.


Perfect For a Crowded Shop This router table is bigger than most but takes up less storage space because it isn't mounted on legs or a cabinet. To use the table, lay it across sawhorses. To store it, hang it on a wall or slip it into any narrow space.


It’s important to understand why your cat is on the counter in the first place. Getting into the food probably isn’t the most compelling reason, although food certainly can add to the appeal. By nature, cats like high places, which give them a commanding view of their world and offer protection from natural enemies. If you’re going to ask your cat to give up your counters, you need to offer an alternative.


Now, the deterrents. Some people swear by spray bottles, but unless you are the stealthiest person on earth, your cat will quickly figure out that you are doing the spraying. That’s not great for your relationship, and it tends to teach your cat to behave only when you’re home. Instead, cover the counters with textures cats hate — aluminum foil is one example; cardboard covered with double-faced masking tape or shelf liner is another. No, you won’t have your counters covered forever, but you will need to keep them covered while your cat learns to use the new perches. For the more determined cat, you can look at harmless automatic devices that discourage counter cruising by making sounds cats dislike when they trigger a pressure pad or electronic eye by jumping up.


Twenty years ago, I barely had enough money for a router, much less a router table. So I built a quick, crude version from a hunk of old countertop supported by steel rails from a bed frame. I always intended to upgrade, but when I test drove other tables, I always found that I liked my homemade one better. It’s tough, easy to take to job sites and easy to store. But my favorite feature is the screw-on fence face. In two minutes, I can switch to a face with a larger hole for larger bits or a super-tall face for vertical routing. And since it’s replaceable, I don’t mind driving screws into it to secure featherboards or guides.


A. If pressed on the issue, many people will admit that their cats walk all over them, and that includes walking wherever they choose, including kitchen counters. And many of those people are just fine with that. I’m with you on this, however. I don’t want my pets to walk where I eat.